H i r a e t h

yatzer:

This enchanting photograph was taken in 1995 by renowned French photographer François Halard during his visit to the landmark Palm Springs home of architect Alfred Frey.

yatzer:

This enchanting photograph was taken in 1995 by renowned French photographer François Halard during his visit to the landmark Palm Springs home of architect Alfred Frey.

(via organicafe)

Your handwriting. The way you walk. Which china pattern you choose. It’s all giving you away. Everything you do shows your hand. Everything is a self-portrait. Everything is a diary.

Chuck Palahniuk  (via mercurieux)

(via acve)

How to kill someone;
Hold their hand and then never touch their skin again,
See them nearly everyday and pretend they don’t exist,
Act like everything you ever said to them was a lie.

Was this your plan all along? (via organicafe)

(via organicafe)

candleghost:

Study Ten - Thomas Hooper, Ink, Acrylic & Gouache, on Paper, 7×11″, 2010

candleghost:

Study Ten - Thomas Hooper, Ink, Acrylic & Gouache, on Paper, 7×11″, 2010

(via oarsis)

2headedsnake:

Oliver Grunewald

Night photography of volcanoes in Indonesia

(via myampgoesto11)

myampgoesto11:

Candaş Şişman: I/P/O-cle, 2013

Light Installation 

Lenses, light, mirror, sound, container, fog
1200X240X240 cm

I – Input P – Process 
O – Output
cle – Cycle

IPOcle is an installation simulating the way we perceive the reality that exist in our physical world and the various layers, variables, cycles that are present in this process of perceiving. With the senses that we have, we can perceive only a limited portion of the physical reality that surrounds us. This perceived physicality keeps altering as it goes through many layers and processes (biological and psychological) in our brains. These perceptions draw our perceptual schemas and these schemas in turn shape the reality we perceive. Our perceptions and what we perceive, therefore, constantly reshape call each other into being, as in a vicious cycle. At this point, how can we define what reality really is, what constant can we refer to, and aren’t we supposed to look at this issue in a more holistic and intertwined manner?

The IPOCle is made of a strong light source, lenses, a convex mirror, a fog machine and a sound system; installed inside a dark container. The light source is located so that the goes through the lenses, hung one after another. The refracted light reaches the mirror. The convex mirror transforms the light and reflects it back. The fog machine keeps running to make the dispersed light visible for us; while a base frequency keeps running in the background.

The light and the light source describe physical reality and input / The lenses: The process and various factors of perception / The mirror: What is perceived, the output and the cycle.

The artist has preferred to make use of common grounds that various studies meet; instead of basing all his work on a single research or researcher. Therefore, the I/P/O-cle project also focuses on the relations between various research topics and the patterns that reveal as a result of these relations. Şişman’s choice of research topics are about physics and neuro-sciences. “Perception” is at the intersection of these fields, therefore is the base for the project’s hybrid structure.

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likeafieldmouse:

Benjamin Kress - Untitled Transformations Nos. 1 & 3 (2004)

(via likeafieldmouse)

le-plus-beau-des-mensonges:

Venus Grotto in Ludwig II’s Linderhof Palace

"The grotto is wholly artificial and was built for the king as an illustration of the First Act of Wagner’s "Tannhäuser”. Ludwig liked to be rowed over the lake in his golden swan-boat but at the same time he wanted his own Blue Grotto of Capri. Therefore 24 dynamos had been installed and so already in the time of Ludwig II it was possible to illuminate the grotto in changing colours.”

le-plus-beau-des-mensonges:

Venus Grotto in Ludwig II’s Linderhof Palace

"The grotto is wholly artificial and was built for the king as an illustration of the First Act of Wagner’s "Tannhäuser”. Ludwig liked to be rowed over the lake in his golden swan-boat but at the same time he wanted his own Blue Grotto of Capri. Therefore 24 dynamos had been installed and so already in the time of Ludwig II it was possible to illuminate the grotto in changing colours.”

(via oarsis)

(via organicafe)